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Showing posts with label reviews. Show all posts

bose soundsport earbuds

bose soundsport earbuds
image credit: Bose

Bose Soundsport Earbuds

 Whether you're looking for the best running headphones or the best sports headphones, chances are you've been looking for what the Bose catalog has to offer. After all, this is a brand that has built a solid reputation for producing some of the best wireless sports headphones on the market in recent years.

But should you consider. Bose sports headphones? Their introduction follows on the heels of the excellent Bose QuietComfort Earbuds, of which we are huge fans. The big question is, how much of that brilliance has Bose managed to pass on to its cheaper siblings? Some elements have, of course, been sacrificed and changed to achieve a lower price; but is there the same character? If so, we might be looking at five-star shooting.

Design and build

The design and construction of the Bose Sports Earbuds is a cross between the new QuietComfort headphones and an old pair of true wireless Bose SoundSport Free headphones.

The shells are smaller and slightly more rounded than the ones you get with the QuietComforts, although they still protrude just as far from your ears. They don't look ridiculous, however, and look much thinner than the SoundSport Free, though nowhere near as thin as rivals like the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live.

bose soundsport earbuds
image credit: Bose


The Bose Sport earphones seem to be a bit cheaper than their siblings, as they use more durable plastic on the touch surfaces. This, of course, was to be expected. They are also slightly lighter than the QuietComforts at 6.75g (vs. 8.5g for the QuietComforts).

You have a choice of three finishes: Triple Black, Glacier White or Baltic Blue from our review sample.

Bluetooth version 5.1

Noise Cancellation No

Battery life 5 hours (15 with charger)

Voice control Siri, Google Assistant

Completes x3

As has become the norm for Bose wireless earphones lately, you only come with silicone tips in three different sizes (small, medium, and large). We would normally criticize this selection as quite limited were it not for the fact that it is relatively easy for us to find the right size. The combination of large, soft, and flexible silicone eartips (Bose calls them "umbrella"), combined with the equally soft wing tips, really helps the earbuds sit securely in place without pushing them into your ear canal. This also makes them comfortable for long listening sessions.

The tips are easy to swap out too - other manufacturers can definitely learn a thing or two about the ease with which you can take one headphone off and put the other on.

The isolation you get from the Bose headphones is good, though we'd be lying if we said we didn't miss out on the efficiency and noise-canceling level provided by the QuietComfort. Headphones. Yes, they're more expensive, but it's not uncommon to get noise canceling headphones even at that price. Let's take the excellent Sony WF-SP800N as an example.

bose soundsport earbuds
image credit: Bose

Capabilities

The sports headphones are IP4 rated, which means they are sweat and weather resistant, so you shouldn't have any problems if you get caught in a light downpour while on your weekly 5K run.

Battery life averages five hours per charge, and the carrying case provides two more full charges for a total of 15 hours. That compares to six hours and two extra charges of the QuietComfort headphones and a full nine hours on a single charge from the Sony WF-SP800N. You should be able to take a dead battery from zero to two hours with a 15-minute quick charge via USB-C. Unlike QuietComfort, there is no wireless charging here.

bose soundsport earbuds
image credit: Bose

The carrying case for the Bose Sport headphones is slightly smaller and narrower than the QuietComfort headphones. It's a little longer due to the way the buds are arranged inside. A group of five LEDs on the front show you how much battery is left in the case, and inside there is a pairing button that you will need to press every time you want to connect the buds to a new source.

We find the pairing process a little tricky and inconsistent. We're trying to pair them with iPhones and MacBooks, switching between them manually in the app when needed. But the transition isn't as smooth as we think. Sports headphones also have trouble simply reconnecting to the same device and we have to try restarting the pairing process several times. We really didn't have these issues with the QuietComfort headphones.

That you cannot be connected to two sources at the same time, such as a laptop to listen to music and a phone to make or receive random calls. You must switch manually in the Bose Music app. You will need to download the app on your Android or iOS smartphone before using them for the first time.

The old version of the Bose Soundsport Free used to have physical controls, but the sports headphones follow the steps of the QuietComfort headphones with touch controls built into the surface of the earpiece. Most of the controls you need are supported, including pause, play, and skip forward. Double-tap the right earbud to play, pause, or answer/reject calls. Press and hold your finger on the right earpiece to call the voice assistant.

Double-tapping the left earpiece skips forward, but, oddly enough, there is no way to return to the beginning of the track. Not exactly a good option, but a strange omission, considering that almost all competitors offer this functionality.

Thanks to a recent firmware update, you can also assign the touch surface on the right earcup as a volume control. Swipe up and down to decrease them, and swipe up to, you guessed it, increase the volume.

Call quality is quite good by earphone standards. The microphones are in the right earcup, which is the primary one, and your voice sounds relatively clear under normal conditions. You do hear wind noise when you use them outside, but it's not enough to make us use them.


bose soundsport earbuds
image credit: Bose

Sound

Given the performance of their noise canceling siblings, we had high hopes for the Bose Sports Earbuds. And to a large extent they work. We can't help but be impressed by their measured approach. Every track we play is handled fairly and honestly. High frequencies do not irritate or irritate.

Low frequencies are not overcooked, as they can be found in less efficient wireless headphones. The bass notes have richness and fullness, but they never sound fat and sloppy. Bose's enthusiastic and flamboyant presentation ensures they don't linger at the reception. When you first listen, they really draw you in.

Play Sting and the Police's defeat you and this plucked bass has a great sense of weight as it expresses this reggae influence. The drum beats sound solid and precise, propelling the song forward at a constant speed. There's a fullness and richness to Sting's vocals that isn't stuffy, but you feel he's a bit lacking in terms of direct expression. The best pairs of headphones for the money sound clearer and reveal a little more detail.

Play End Credits from Pirates of the Caribbean: Stranger Tides and the orchestra sound rich and detailed - although, again, the very best takes away a few extra layers of detail and delivers dynamics with more refinement. The track does not reach the same heights as when listening through, say, the Sony WF-1000XM3. The strings don't sparkle as much and their dynamism feels a bit stunted when you listen to a track through the Bose. Sports headphones are still very comfortable to listen to, they just don't make music as special as the best at this level.

Verdict

The Bose Sport Earbuds are a good pair of wireless earbuds, but we won't call them great. Their musical and powerful balance is easy to get along with, and would be a good fit for those who love sports who don't really need a bass-heavy sound; but they don't have the sophistication or subtlety needed for a five-star rating at this price point.

ASSESSMENTS

  • Sound 4
  • Build 4
  • Comfort 5

Reviewers Liked

  • One of the best-sounding wireless headphones yet
  • Well-designed charging bass
  • Comfortable to wear and stay in place during exercise routines
  • Water resistant
  • Rock solid connection

Reviewers Didn't Like

  • Relatively large buds stick out of ear
  • Noise isolation is lacking for noisy environments like a gym
  • Expensive compared to competition
  • High price tag

Bose Soundsport Earbuds Price  $139.99





Bose Soundsport Earbuds Specs


Wireless Connectivity
Bluetooth4.1
Wireless Range30' / 9.1 m
NFCNone
Wired Connectivity
Charging PortPins
Battery
Battery ChemistryLithium-Ion
Runtime5 Hours
5 Days (Standby)
Recharge Time1.5 Hours
Charging Case
Additional Runtime10 Hours
Charging InterfaceMicro-USB
Physical
Material of ConstructionPlastic, Silicone
Packaging Info
Package Weight1.05 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH)8 x 6.1 x 2.1"

bose quietcomfort earbuds

bose quietcomfort earbuds

bose quietcomfort earbuds


The Bose QuietComfort Earbuds are Bose's latest product to compete with Sony for market leadership in premium wireless earbuds. It is about this model that will be discussed in my review.

Bose Quietcomfort Earbuds Review

Design and construction

Many have scoffed at the bean shape of the Galaxy Buds Live, but the Bose QuietComfort Earbuds are somewhat similar. However, the case here is made more subtle and elegant. Their size may seem large only with the new Bose StayHear Max attachments.

The essence of StayHear Max is that any part that touches the ear should be made of soft silicone, this contributes to a more comfortable use. Earbuds sit very securely in the ears, so the headset is great for sports.

In the kit we also have additional nozzles of larger and smaller sizes. The QuietComfort Earbuds come in two colors: black and white, each version looks very stylish.

bose quietcomfort earbuds

Touch control

The Bose QuietComfort Earbuds support touch controls, although there aren't many options available to us.

A single tap on the right earpiece pauses or plays, the action also allows you to answer or end a call. A long press activates the voice assistant on your smartphone or rejects an incoming call.

Double tapping the left earbud toggles between noise canceling modes. Press and hold can be assigned to one of two functions: checking the battery status or skipping to the next track. In addition, swipe up and down allows you to adjust the volume.

Features and functions

Bose QuietComfort Earbuds are IPX4 sweat and rain resistant, making them even more suitable for workouts.

When you take the headphones out or put them back in, the music will automatically stop and play. Alas, only the right earpiece is endowed with headset functions using it. you can answer calls, however, the option must be activated in the settings.

bose quietcomfort earbuds


Bose Music App

The Bose Music app for Android and iOS has received a lot of updates since the release of the Noise Canceling Headphones 700. The interface is nicer, although navigation remains simple.

Unfortunately, there is no equalizer here, however, you can choose from 10 levels of active noise cancellation for QuietComfort Earbuds. There is also volume control, playback control, ANC settings, battery status information and other useful options.

There is no built-in voice assistant in the headphones, but you can call the assistant from your smartphone - by touching and holding your finger on the right “bud”.


SVS

SVS SB13 Ultra Review

 

SVS SB13 Ultra Review

SVS SB13 Ultra Review

As an audiophile, I've come to relate the size, weight, and cost of a subwoofer as quick'n'dirty marks of its quality. The subwoofers that have worked best in my enormous listening room—the Velodyne ULD-18 and DD-18+, Muse Model 18, REL Studio III, JL Audio Fathom f113, and Revel Sub30—each gauge in excess of 130 lbs and cost more than $2500. With a portion of my reference accounts, every one of them have accomplished what Robert Harley portrayed in the April 1991 issue of Stereophile as the objectives of a quality subwoofer: "consistent joining, speed, no bulge, and mind blowing bass augmentation." Yet are back-busting weight, unmanageable size, and nosebleed cost fundamental to accomplishing those objectives?

SV Sound doesn't think so. Their fixed, self-fueled SVS SB13 Ultra subwoofer weighs under 100 lbs, yet flaunts a 3600W pinnacle enhancer. SVS sells this model straightforwardly through their site and offers purchasers a 45-day, in-home time for testing, with cash returned in full assuming that the sub doesn't work out. SVS's site has visit includes, and gives Merlin, a subwoofer-arrangement wizard. Type for the sake of your fundamental speakers, and Merlin suggests the "SVS subwoofer that gives the best match, including the specific settings expected to streamline the sub's sound."

Fascinated by SVS's methodology, I seized a proposal by Nicholas Brown, SVS's PR delegate, to survey the SVS SB13 Ultra.


The SVS SB13 Ultra Review

. . . is an astonishingly reduced, fixed box subwoofer. A 17.4" block, it's 3.6" more limited, 3.1" smaller, 10.4" shallower, 63 lbs lighter, and $400 more affordable than the ported rendition, the PB13-Ultra, which I investigated in the August 2008 issue.


Estimations show the ported PB13-Ultra has the more extented profound bass reaction, yet SVS's Mark Mason noticed that the fixed SVS SB13 Ultra can exploit room support of the exceptionally low frequencies; the ported form should utilize a precarious subsonic channel to try not to overdrive its woofer underneath the port tuning recurrence.


The SVS SB13 Ultra has a solitary, front-terminating 13.5" drive-unit. An exclusively tooled, pass on cast aluminum bin that holds the light, inflexible Rohacell-composite cone with double straight roll insects and a sewed, allegorical encompass with enormous outing. The engine, advanced with limited component examination (FEA), comprises of a bifilar-injury, level wire, eight-layer aluminum voice curl 3" in width, and a polyimide-impregnated fiberglass previous with a custom hole expansion plate to expand its straight stroke, for lower mutilation. The attractive field is made by double Genox 8H/Y-35 ferrite magnets, and the post vent is curiously large, for more prominent cooling. These parts are arranged in an "overhung" plan that broadens the voice-curl past the hole on one or the other side of the shaft piece, to improve its proficiency in a moderate size fixed arrangement. When played without limiters, channels, or adjustment, the driver's low inductance stretches out its recurrence reaction to 300Hz. Its manual expresses that it utilizes a "profoundly progressed and modern Digital Signal Processor (DSP) . . . to accomplish the objective recurrence reaction," and "highlights a recurrence subordinate limiter/blower calculation with movable assault/delivery and pressure boundaries."

The SVS SVS SB13 Ultra is fueled by an implicit Sledge STA-1000D class-D intensifier with a result of 1000W RMS (3600W pinnacle dynamic). Including MOSFET yield gadgets and a switch-mode power supply, the Sledge is more modest, all the more remarkable, and more proficient than the 750W Switched Hybrid (class-A/B, class-D) amp utilized in the PB13-Ultra. Autostart and Green backup modes switch the amp on rapidly when a sign shows up at the info terminals.


Mark Mason let me know that, utilizing the CEA 2010 standard 31Hz sign in a 2pi climate with an amplifier set at 2m, at sound-pressure levels (SPLs) with under 10% complete consonant mutilation (THD), the SB13-Ultra's most extreme pinnacle acoustic result was 111.4dB, as contrasted and the 118.9dB guaranteed for the PB13-Ultra.


Worked on Controls

While the SVS SB13 Ultra doesn't accompany a controller, the UI comprises of a little, back board LCD screen and a solitary control handle, which SVS calls the Integrated Function Controller (IFC). Turning the handle looks through eight arrangement and control works, one by one showed on the LCD. Push the IFC once to choose a capacity, then, at that point, go it to look through the submenus. Immediately push it twice (double tapped) to get back to the high level menu. The submenus include: various high-and low-pass hybrid corner-recurrence settings somewhere in the range of 31 and 125Hz, in addition to two distinctive channel slants (12 or 24dB/octave); stage movable from 0° to 180° in augmentations of 15°; high-pass defer persistently factor from 1 to 10 milliseconds, to adjust in time the results of the satellite speakers and sub; three room-remuneration channels (40Hz for rooms of under 1400 cubic feet, 31Hz for rooms of 1400–2400ft3, and 25Hz for rooms more prominent than 2400ft3 (6 or 12dB/octave); two parametric equalizer (PEQ) groups offering 13 diverse focus frequencies somewhere in the range of 31 and 125Hz; and nine unique Q esteems, from 2.0 to 14.4, for decreasing the biggest and broadest room-mode tops.

SVS SB13-Ultra powered subwoofer


The IFC cleans up the SB13-Ultra's back board, leaving as it were: the unequal (RCA) and adjusted (XLR) information sources and results for the right and left channels; a switch for choosing line or high voltage level; a power switch; and an IEC jack for the separable power rope.

Room, Setup, Measurement

I've utilized a similar listening space for more than 20 years. Estimating 25' long by 13' wide by 12' high, it encases a volume of 3900 cubic feet. The left divider takes care of an enormous straight window by Hunter Douglas texture conceals. Under the strong oak floor is an incomplete storm cellar. Two region mats cover the vast majority of the floor, including the space between the listening seat and my Quad ESL-989 speakers. Albeit enormous, the room's inadequate goods permit these electrostatic boards to create pinnacles of 90dB SPL at my listening seat. Through a 8' by 4' entryway, the back of the room opens into a 25' by 15' kitchen.

The absolute first subwoofer I audited utilizing this room was Velodyne's ULD-18, for the October 1989 issue. Going with a couple of Quad ESL-63 electrostatics, the ULD-18 did best when set in a corner, and I utilized similar situations for this survey. My Quad ESL-989s stood 6' 8" separated at their inward edges, the left speaker 18" from the left divider, the right speaker 18" from the underlying divider unit on the right, and the two of them 5' 5" from the front divider. The SVS SB13 Ultra was in a front corner, 3' behind the right-channel Quad. My listening seat was 7' 8" from the Quads' front bewilders, and 10' 8" from the front of the SVS SB13 Ultra.


SVS SB13-Ultra powered subwoofer

Setting up, adjusting, and incorporating a SVS SB13 Ultra into a sound framework is all around portrayed in the plainly composed, 34-page manual, which suggests that the sub's room reaction be upgraded either a RadioShack Sound Level Meter and Microsoft Excel, or the Avia II: Guide to Home Theater test DVD (Ovation B19485, $44).


Since I didn't have A/V collector however which to play Avia II, I utilized my Studio Six iTestMic, an expert grade test and estimation receiver for the iPhone 4 and iPad. The mike plugs straightforwardly into the iPhone's 30-pin connector, and auto-adjusts while drawing almost no power from the telephone. It's undeniably more exact than the iPhone's own mike for precisely testing and setting up subwoofers, just as for estimating commotion levels, and sound levels up to 120dB. Studio Six's AudioTools application runs the iTestMic, stores the information on the iPhone, and breaks down and charts its estimations. For test tones, I played, on my Bryston BCD-1 CD player, an advanced record of uncorrelated pink commotion provided by Kevin Voecks, of Revel speakers.

To start with, I ran the preamplifier yield links straightforwardly to a couple of Theta Digital Prometheus monoblocks, to run the Quads full reach. Utilizing AudioTools' Real Time Analyzer (RTA), their in-room recurrence reaction estimated 25Hz–20kHz (fig.1). This diagram showed room-mode tops at 80 and 40Hz, yet the reaction tumbled off underneath 40Hz by 15dB at 25Hz.

I disengaged the Quads, joined the preamplifier's result links to the SVS's bits of feedbacks, and set the sub's result playing pink clamor by turning the IFC handle until AudioTools' SPL module enlisted 75dB at my listening seat. I then, at that point, ran adjusted interconnects from the sub's high-pass results to the Theta speakers, and set the high-and low-pass channel corner frequencies to the suggested 63Hz with 24dB/octave slants. I betrayed and changed the sub's result to match the Quads' acoustic result until the iTestMic RTA histogram bars were level at 100 and 40Hz. That finished the underlying alignment and change of the framework.


SVS SB13-Ultra powered subwoofer

The absolute first subwoofer I investigated utilizing this room was Velodyne's ULD-18, for the October 1989 issue. Going with a couple of Quad ESL-63 electrostatics, the ULD-18 did best when put in a corner, and I utilized similar situations for this audit. My Quad ESL-989s stood 6' 8" separated at their internal edges, the left speaker 18" from the left divider, the right speaker 18" from the inherent divider unit on the right, and the two of them 5' 5" from the front divider. The SVS SB13 Ultra was in a front corner, 3' behind the right-channel Quad. My listening seat was 7' 8" from the Quads' front confuses, and 10' 8" from the front of the SVS SB13 Ultra.

Setting up, adjusting, and incorporating a SVS SB13 Ultra into a sound framework is all around portrayed in the plainly composed, 34-page manual, which suggests that the sub's room reaction be enhanced either a RadioShack Sound Level Meter and Microsoft Excel, or the Avia II: Guide to Home Theater test DVD (Ovation B19485, $44).

Since I didn't have A/V recipient however which to play Avia II, I utilized my Studio Six iTestMic, an expert grade test and estimation receiver for the iPhone 4 and iPad. The mike plugs straightforwardly into the iPhone's 30-pin connector, and auto-adjusts while drawing almost no power from the telephone. It's undeniably more exact than the iPhone's own mike for precisely testing and setting up subwoofers, just as for estimating commotion levels, and sound levels up to 120dB. Studio Six's AudioTools application runs the iTestMic, stores the information on the iPhone, and examines and diagrams its estimations. For test tones, I played, on my Bryston BCD-1 CD player, a computerized record of uncorrelated pink commotion provided by Kevin Voecks, of Revel speakers.

In the first place, I ran the preamplifier yield links straightforwardly to a couple of Theta Digital Prometheus monoblocks, to run the Quads full reach. Utilizing AudioTools' Real Time Analyzer (RTA), their in-room recurrence reaction estimated 25Hz–20kHz (fig.1). This chart showed room-mode tops at 80 and 40Hz, however the reaction tumbled off beneath 40Hz by 15dB at 25Hz.

I disengaged the Quads, connected the preamplifier's result links to the SVS's bits of feedbacks, and set the sub's result playing pink commotion by turning the IFC handle until AudioTools' SPL module enrolled 75dB at my listening seat. I then, at that point, ran adjusted interconnects from the sub's high-pass results to the Theta speakers, and set the high-and low-pass channel corner frequencies to the suggested 63Hz with 24dB/octave inclines. I betrayed and changed the sub's result to match the Quads' acoustic result until the iTestMic RTA histogram bars were level at 100 and 40Hz. That finished the underlying alignment and change of the framework

SVS SB13-Ultra powered subwoofer

SVS

SVS PB16 ULTRA REVIEW


SVS PB16 ULTRA REVIEW

SVS PB16 ULTRA REVIEW


USD 2,499$

PB16-Ultra Introduction

The PB13-Ultra has for a long while been SVS's chief subwoofer, and all through the long haul, has consistently been referred to as one of the 'big bosses' of subwoofers. i.e., quite possibly the most awe-inspiring business subwoofer open. While it really remains a great choice in its worth reach, there have been various headways all through the long haul, and fighting subwoofer makers by and by offer a couple of solid and connecting with different choices.

SVS has not been known to become smug, yet it had been for so long since the farewell of their last top-end subwoofer that the presentation of the new 16-Ultra series took a critical number of us in the sound neighborhood. SVS has advanced their new 16-Ultra series as the most outstanding subwoofers on earth, so we were incredibly anxious to have SVS send us their new ported super-sub for review, the PB16-Ultra. So moving along, could we jump into the PB16-Ultra and see how much a subwoofer SVS can bring to you for a cool $2,500.

Dumping and Setup

The PB16-Ultra boats through freight and the holder appeared lashed to a bed. The transportation weight is an astonishing 207 lbs., so various people will be relied upon to move it inside the home expecting there are steps or steps crashing into the home. The holder has fundamental handles that make moving it sensible for two people once off the bed. The boxed subwoofer should be set near where the emptied subwoofer's last target is wanted to be, and the legitimization behind this is in light of the fact that it is easy to rush the sub there in the inside packaging, and when the subwoofer is put there, the client will not want to move it around much a brief time frame later in view of the weight. Dumping bearings are contained inside the inward overlay of the case, yet the client should simply open the forward and raise box terminations and slide the sub out of one end by pushing it from the contrary side. The PB16-Ultra is especially squeezed, and a lot of accepted was set into how to easily dump such a significant and immense subwoofer. I was worried about how I intended to manage dumping such a bruiser, so SVS's undertakings are overall around appreciated here.


Setting up the PB16-Ultra isn't especially jumbled regardless of the way that there is a ton occurring with it. There is a fast starting associate, yet I would enable clients, especially youngster subwoofer owners, to go through the owner's manual. It covers the movement of the subwoofer totally, gives extraordinary position urging, and it even obligingly reminds clients not to eat the battery to the regulator (it is hurtful!).


Appearance

While the sheer size will absolutely be a state of mind executioner for specific people, the awesomeness are great. This is also incredible as a tremendous ported subwoofer can look. The piano shimmer finish and changed edges go very far towards making it elegantly satisfactory for the people who could customarily avoid such a gigantic thing. A slanted, top-mounted show that is sunk into the top front edge adds a fair, automotively-styled touch. The glass fiber covered cone has a hypnotizing sheen with 'SVS' engraved in the center. SVS has given a changed metal grille, but it is an exhausting faint surface, and the PB16-Ultra looks much better without it. One slight condemn: I would have inclined toward an alluring grille so there would be no observable connections for the grille guides, yet that would not have been functional for the significant grille that SVS gives. SVS has endeavored to make a gigantic ported isolate region as elegant as could be anticipated, and they have made a superb appearance



SVS PB16 ULTRA REVIEW


Plan diagram

The PB16-Ultra arrangement bestows many arrangement resemblances to the PB13-Ultra, and, at first, one could appallingly think it is essentially a greater variation of the PB13-ultra. Regardless, in the motor, there are a couple of progressive departures from the PB13-Ultra, which we will analyze in a bit. In the first place, we should discuss the verifiable comparability, the alcove plan. The PB16-Ultra is a front-ending, triple-ported, variable tuned subwoofer. It has three strategies for action: three ports open, two ports open, or fixed, which according to SVS, have specific - 3 dB points of 17 Hz, 14 Hz, and 21 Hz. For individuals who are new to subwoofers, this implies when one of the ports are fixed with an included port fitting, the subwoofer can play back additional bass frequencies, in spite of the way that it comes to the burden of more grounded significant bass. Fixing all of the ports, in any case, kills a lot of the significant bass outcome all things considered. A single port open mode was not maintained by the PB16-Ultra, perhaps because port unsettling influence would happen too really with that much air evacuation versus so negligible port volume.

While the PB16-Ultra fenced in region arrangement doesn't break any new ground for SVS, the driver design is a huge change, and for SVS as well with respect to most financially made subwoofers. Setting to the side the imperceptibly capricious woofer width of 16", it uses an incredibly phenomenal motor design.

SVS PB16 ULTRA REVIEW


The cone is created utilizing an astoundingly beautiful glass fiber overlay with an upheld composite cone sub-structure, and is related with the cast aluminum bushel by a tremendous flexible incorporate pb16 ampc.jpgand a very colossal nomex bug. Two shorting rings are used to diminish inductance and thusly even-demand symphonious contorting. The motor uses four stacked ferrite magnets, giving the motor region itself a 56 lbs. weight, which makes up the majority of the driver's colossal 63 lbs. Ordinarily in this piece of the review I would kill the driver to take a couple of pictures, simultaneously, due to the weight, the driver is mounted in an exceptional way that makes dispensing with it an incredibly clumsy cooperation, so we will use driver pictures that SVS has given us.

SVS PB16 ULTRA REVIEW


Close by critical advances in the driver office, SVS has added improvements in the increase as well. To power such a ruthless driver, the PB16-Ultra usages a 1,500-watt, class-D Sledge speaker. The intensifier is so jam-stacked with features that instead of endeavoring to show them all, I will address a few the highlights. The enhancer can be obliged by either the front LED show, regulator, or by SVS's mobile phone application. Something wonderful with regards to the phone application is the ability to control the repeat response with a parametric agent. For sure, for all intents and purposes all aspects of execution can be compelled by SVS's application, which is extraordinary for individuals who like to never-endingly change their sub, since now they can do as such from their lounge chairs. The improvement uses a totally discrete MOSFET yield stage rather than an organized circuit yield stage. MOSFETS offer favored exchange speed and lower bending over the activity amps commonly used in class D enhancers, especially for the colossal energy that the 16-Ultra drivers can pull in. Taking care of is done by a 50Mhz Analog Devices Audio DSP with twofold exactness 56bit filtering, which sounds like more taking care of force than is expected for low PB16-Interio-rCab.jpgfrequency sound waves. Regardless, since dealing with power is so humble nowadays, why might it matter? The PB16-Ultra has both XLR and RCA data sources and results, so network with any state of the art device addresses no issue. Obvious level data sources and results might have been extraordinary for more settled or more straightforward courses of action using composed amps, yet those sorts of plans are ending up being dynamically fascinating, so I can't fault SVS for disposing of those affiliations.

Whenever people portray their subwoofer pantries, the saying 'created like a tank' is consistently used. Concerning the PB16-Ultra, 'gathered like a tank' doesn't even very depict it. Imagine the best heaviest tank made, and a short time later maybe we have an appropriate assessment for the PB16-Ultra. (Minor wandering: a Google search says the heaviest tank made is the WW2 German model Panzer VIII Maus, weighing 188 tons!) The PB16-Ultra is worked with 1" MDF sides and inside setting and 2" thick in the front bewilder. Two window upholds are set near the point of convergence of the sub with one of the backings insightfully supporting the motor section of the driver and the other supporting the ports. A liberal layer of stuffing lines the authority all around to help with damping resonances. The grille is incredibly significant and extraordinary; it genuinely will help with protecting the woofer and ports from young people and pets. It looks like a plate of assurance for the front of the sub, making the tank similitude significantly more appropriate. To help the full weight of the PB16-Ultra, SVS used six flexible feet rather than four, with two feet supporting the midsection.


Specification


Driver:


16" broadness cone


Project aluminum compartment


Four high-grade ferrite magnets


Twofold shorting rings


Widened post piece


8" estimation edge-wound voice circle


Nomex bug


Twofold 24 strand copper and Nomex composite leads


Fiberglass composite tar cone


Flexible incorporate


Amplifier

Sledge STA-1500D DSP speaker


1,500 watts RMS incessant (5,000+ watts top dynamic)


Class D topography


50Mhz Analog Devices Audio DSP with twofold precision 56bit filtering


Dynamic PFC (Power Factor Correction)


XLR and RCA sound framework input/yield with very wide information voltage for buyer and master sound applications


Front-mounted show with subwoofer controls and 8 digit LED show


Subwoofer Control and Bass Management Smartphone App for